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Comments

Comments

Comment reply on Merlac's Completed Build: Aurora Borealis

  • 26 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks!

Comment reply on Merlac's Completed Build: Aurora Borealis

  • 27 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks!

Comment reply on Merlac's Completed Build: Aurora Borealis

  • 27 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks! To be honest, I just used thick two-sided tape to attach the display. Part of a raspberry pi case and white electric tape was then used to cover the ugly parts.

Comment reply on Merlac's Completed Build: Aurora Borealis

  • 27 months ago
  • 2 points

To the graphics card via HDMI. The cable goes through the case, out from the back and into a normal HDMI port.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Mod mic"

  • 27 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Mod mic"

  • 27 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm using the version 5 and I have nothing bad to say about it. Some users claim the 4 has a bit lower gains, so it needs to be boosted a bit, but some say there's no difference.

It should be noted that there can be a background hiss if you use either version with integrated sound card instead of dedicated.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Should i go for a i7 8700k if im not going to overclock ??"

  • 27 months ago
  • 1 point

There is nothing wrong buying a "K"-CPU even if you don't OC, if you have the money. The 8700K has 6 cores and 12 threads, which means it's great for stuff that support multiple cores, such as 3D-rendering and other such workloads even if you don't OC.

That being said, it IS an overkill if you only need to play games. There might be a future where more than 6 cores help gaming, but not yet. Only very few games at the moment use more than 4 cores and I don't think anything uses more than 6.

Streaming while you game changes things a lot. Based on benchmarks, it is very useful to use 6-core 8700K instead of 4-core 7700K, for example. OCing helps a bit, but cores are king.

Comment reply on Merlac's Completed Build: Aurora Borealis

  • 27 months ago
  • 2 points

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Fans for my build"

  • 27 months ago
  • 1 point

You can build your rig first and test the temperatures and noise levels of the included fans. If they are not powerful or silent enough for your taste, you can very easily upgrade later.

Usually included case fans are decent. If you want to spend a bit more money I still recommend to test them first, so you know what to prioritize: airflow, air pressure or silence. You are not using a liquid cooling radiator, so high air pressure is probably not as important.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Best fans for the s340"

  • 27 months ago
  • 1 point

Out of those three fans, the Sickleflows have the best airflow and air pressure. The Corsair has better airflow than the NZXT FN V2 included with S340, but I think it's also louder. Air pressure is roughly the same between NZXT and Corsair.

That being said, I'd say the CoolerMaster Sickleflows might be best choices for your intake.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "s340 Fans."

  • 27 months ago
  • 1 point

The S340 (and S340 Elite) come with 120mm NZXT FN V2 fans, which have airflow of 45 CFM with 0.9 mm H20 air pressure.

I assume with Corsair Sickleflow you actually mean CoolerMaster SickleFlow 120mm LED-fans, which have airflow of 69 CFM and air pressure of 2.94 mm H2O.

We can now see that the SickleFlow has better airflow and air pressure, so based on purely that I'd say it's a worthy replacement, if price and aesthetics don't matter. SickleFlow is also a bit quieter in theory, but the difference is probably not noticeable.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "asus rog z370 i - high pitched buzzing"

  • 27 months ago
  • 1 point

My best guess would be coil whine. Coil whine is vibrations of electronic components when electricity runs through them. It's usually not audible to human ears, but virtually everything has it. I think the most common source of audible coil whine are powerful graphics cards while gaming.

There isn't much you can do about it, but some combinations of power supplies and other components create more whine than others, so if you have an extra PSU you can try checking if there is any difference, even if the source of the sound is your motherboard.

Another possibility of hissing or whistling sounds is capacitor squeal. This is actually serious, as your motherboard might be dying. Capacitors are the round tower-like parts of your motherboard and you should check if any of them are bulging or leaking anything from the top. However, I'd guess the coil whine is much more likely cause of the sound.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Websites where I can makes cases?"

  • 27 months ago
  • 1 point

If you want to make a case from scratch you could try laser cutting service such as Ponoko https://www.ponoko.com/

And if you seek cases which are somewhat customized to order, you could check out some Caselabs products http://www.caselabs-store.com/

Comment reply on Merlac's Completed Build: Aurora Borealis

  • 27 months ago
  • 2 points

Finland.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Any dual-motherboard cases?"

  • 27 months ago
  • 1 point

Phanteks Enthoo Mini XL DS http://www.phanteks.com/Enthoo-MiniXL-DS.html

Then there are the huge Caselabs cases like the Magnum THW10, but it might need some customization. At least it has all the space you need. http://www.caselabs-store.com/magnum-thw10-customizable/

And yes, such cases are for special uses so they propably never come cheap.

Comment reply on Merlac's Completed Build: Aurora Borealis

  • 27 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you for your kind words!

Comment reply on Merlac's Completed Build: Aurora Borealis

  • 27 months ago
  • 1 point

I would love to describe an elegant solution, but to be honest I used thick double-sided tape. The edges of the display are a bit ugly, so I ordered a cheap Raspberry Pi case and only used the front part (the white edges around the display). The HDMI cable is hidden with white electrical tape.

If you want a clean solution for your server, experimenting with Raspberry Pi cases might be a good idea, instead of attaching the display circuit board as it is. Custom laser cutting services are quite cheap too.

Comment reply on Merlac's Completed Build: Aurora Borealis

  • 27 months ago
  • 3 points

Thanks! Such screens are widely available for cheap and Rainmeter is very versatile :)

Comment reply on ColeJJones's Completed Build: Mini Gangster

  • 31 months ago
  • 2 points

I'm just comparing Home & Pro features, trying to find out what are the likely advantages of Pro for non-corporate users.

Remote desktop client works at Home too, so I'm guessing you're using server side. I personally prefer TeamViewer for that.

Thanks!

Comment reply on ColeJJones's Completed Build: Mini Gangster

  • 31 months ago
  • 1 point

Why do you use the Pro-version of Win10?

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