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Comments

Comment reply on Forum Topic "8gb or 16gb"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes. Most likely it will work fine, but it cannot be guaranteed.

If you're interested in the (a bit technical and boring) explanation why this happens, you can read more in the link below :)

https://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?57038-Don%92t-combine-memory-kits!-The-meat-and-potatoes-overview

Comment reply on Forum Topic "8gb or 16gb"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

This is what my monitoring shows at the moment: https://www.dropbox.com/s/tbth7qvawy46ade/ram.PNG?raw=1

At the time of that screenshot I'm using Windows 10 Pro with only Chrome open (4 tabs) and few background processes. I think that image answers your question :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "8gb or 16gb"

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

I would very very strongly recommend getting a 16GB kit. I reach 18GB usage almost daily with just Chrome and one (somewhat unoptimized) game. 8GB is simply quite low for modern PCs.

Like other comments say, you could upgrade later, but there is always a small risk of unstability or uncompatibility when using sticks outside the same kit, even if the sticks are "identical". This is because no two sticks are truly identical and only sticks in the same kit have been tested by the manufacturer to work together with best possible speed.

I know ram is quite expensive at the moment, but you can pick the cheapest DDR4 for virtually the same performance as faster ones. (though I recommend 2666MHz instead of 2133MHz)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "White Cases"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

This. Just change the case fans, cover the legs and throw the glass side panel out of the window and you have a white case :)

The biggest "problem" is usually the motherboard, since rarely any unmodded motherboards are white. I think NZXT has motherboards with white covers for this purpose, though.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Fractal Design Focus G vs NZXT s340"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

I have the S340 Elite which is almost identical to S340. The not-perfect airflow is due to dust filters AND a large AIO-cooler radiator installed in the front. I think without the radiator the airflow would be great and with it I don't think it matters since my non-OC CPU and GPU run cool.

Anyway, I love the case. Pics here in PCPP.

My opinion is overclocking your ram is not worth it, especially if you're not overclocking anything else. Just get any cheap DDR4 around 2666MHz. Getting more than 16GB would mean MUCH more though. I peaked at 18GB used memory yesterday using just Chrome and one game.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Gtx 970 temps"

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

95C is usually the limit before damage, but many cards have a safety line around 82C, after which the card starts to temporarily slow down to generate less heat (it's called thermal throttling).

Your overclocking software (like Afterburner) should have a temp limit slider so you can choose the maximum temperature before throttling.

Your 70C under stress is good.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is there a benefit to getting and Intel SSD?"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

All SSD drives are very very reliable, BUT any and all drives should always have backup.

I have used many SSDs from Intel, Samsung and Kingston during the last 9 years and none of them have yet broken. I've heard the new Samsung 970 Pro SSDs are (theoretically) the best, but it should be noted that they are M.2 instead of SATA.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Samsung 960 Evo Help"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

While x4 is faster than x2, it's nothing you are likely to notice. I had my 960 pro in x2 by accident and I didn't notice a thing. Even the calculated speed difference was rather small.

  • Difference between HDD and SSD = oh my GOD!
  • Difference between SSD and M.2 NVMe SSD = pretty nice
  • Difference between M.2 SSD x2 and x4 = it says it's faster on paper so I guess it's faster

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Buy a used SSD that was used in a RAID server?"

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

Modern SSDs have ridiculously good lifetimes. For example Samsung 850 Pro theoretically dies after 9100 terabytes of writing.

Most of my SSDs are being used around 5 TB per year, meaning they would (theoretically) last almost 2000 years if only considering that one criteria. During last 9 years I haven't broken a single SSD and even the first one (Intel X-25) is still being used daily in an old PC.

That being said, any and all drives should always be backed up, because anything can happen. I once had an industrial grade HDD with very long warranty, but it broke down after 6 months.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Will this memory fit?"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Most likely that memory works with both of those motherboards, BUT I don't see it listed in the QVL (qualified vendors list), meaning it's not 100% guaranteed. QVL is not a full compatibility list though, it's only the list of components that has been tested to work.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Can I do Two 4Gb sticks and one 8Gb stick?"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

If this works, I would still recommend against it for many reasons. I assume all sticks are the same type (DDR3 or DDR4 for example), since different types cannot fit in the same slots.

Even IF you get the same CAS latency, timings and voltage, you still might get unstable behaviour. Memory manufactures even advice against mixing identical memory kits, since "identical" sticks from two kits might be a bit different in real world. Only the sticks sold in the same kit are tested and guaranteed to work together with good performance, and even then only if they are listed in the motherboard's memory QVL (qualified vendors list).

If your latency, voltage etc are a match, you could theoretically use sticks with different speed (like 2133MHz and 2666MHz), but you will absolutely get worse performance and probably some unstability.

Short answer: it's not worth it to mix sticks that much, in my opinion.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "RAM + CPU"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

If there is X at the end of a Trident Z memory model, it's AMD optimized (for example F4-3200C14Q-32GTZRX). Without it it's for Intel.

That being said, (someone please correct me if I'm wrong), virtually any DDR4 should work with virtually any DDR4-compatible motherboard and you will not notice any speed difference without precise monitoring software.

If you want to be sure just check your motherboard's memory QVL (Qualified Vendors List) and pick a kit that is at least 16GB total. I think there are Trident Z -models in every modern QVL because of their popularity.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Premiere editing - 8700k or 7820 for upgrade path on X99?"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Both CPUs are good for your use, but I'd pick the 8700K. The X99 chipset is already 4 years old (though your part list says X299) and you would still pay more for such motherboards. The 6 cores and 12 threads of the 8700K are likely to be enough for anyone except those who do video editing as a full time job.

If you want to save money, pick cheap regular DDR4 instead of RGB models. Same goes for the RGB fans, since they are easy to upgrade later. If you really love RGB, you could change your CPU AIO-cooler from Corsair to NZXT Kraken X62 ;)

One of your part lists has 650W PSU, which should be enough, but I'd go 750W to be sure.

A small concern I have is your display. In video work a quality display is usually important, but 300€/$/£ 4K displays aren't usually such. Last time I checked even high-quality 2560×1440 IPS displays were 600-700€/$/£.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Upgrade an old PC"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Open your command prompt (Open Windows Start-menu, write cmd and press Enter).

In the command prompt (the black window) write this and press enter: wmic baseboard get product,Manufacturer

It should then give you the Manufacturer and model of your motherboard. We can then help you upgrade the CPU, if possible. If your motherboard and other parts are very old, upgrading might not be reasonable though.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "1000$ budget for Video Editing"

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

1) OS can be installed from a USB-drive. Cases usually have placeholders for drive bays, which you then remove when you install a drive, so there shouldn't be an empty slot without a drive.

2) Memory speed is one of the least noticeable things when using a PC. I'd say any DDR4 is fine, just get enough of it. 16GB is usually fine, but some workloads might need more.

3) 250GB SSD should be great. If you picked smaller one or wanted to upgrade later, you can easily clone the drive into a new one without having to install everything from scratch.

4) If a case looks good and is cheap, go for it, unless you have specific needs like watercooling. Some cheap cases might have sharp edges, but you should be fine.

5) CPUs are sold in two variations: boxed or tray/bulk. Boxed means there is a cooler in the same box for roughly the same price. Tray or bulk means it's just the CPU and you need to purchase a cooler yourself. The default coolers are usually a bit louder and not as cool, but they are guaranteed to be "enough" if you're not overclocking.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Can someone check my build ? i need recomendations ( its my first build) 700$"

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

Could you give us examples what you will do with the build, gaming or work?

If you're going to play games, you don't need 8-core CPU, which means you could go Intel CPU (and compatible motherboard) instead. Intel i5 8600K is the same price or cheaper, but it has faster core speed, which is better in games. At multi-core working (more than 6 cores!) your 1700X might be better.

I don't have any experience with your choice of CPU cooler, but anything less than $20 is rarely very good, meaning you could just use the one that comes with the CPU and upgrade later if you are not happy with the thermals or noise.

450W power supply should work, but it's a bit on the lower side. You can usually get better efficiency and ease of mind for future upgrades if you pick a bit higher wattage. 550W and upwards should be great.

Remember to buy RAM too, your list doesn't have any at the moment. Any cheap DDR4 should work, I'd recommend 16GB of at least 2133MHz, but no need to get higher than 2666MHz.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "1000$ budget for Video Editing"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Few tips:

1) Do you really need the optical drive? I know you could only save $20 there but I haven't used mine in 7 years.

2) While Intel coffee lakes for example get somewhat noticeable speed boost when you go from 2133MHz memory to 2666MHz, I don't think there is much difference in your Ryzen platform. You can simply choose the cheapest DDR4 which is at least 2133MHz. Your current pick looks fair price and SHOULD work, but it's not in the motherboard QVL, so if you need to be 100% sure you can check there for compatibility.

3) If you need lots of storage space and you have a tight budget, you don't have to go SSD (except the OS drive). I very very strongly recommend having a SSD for your OS and primary programs, even if all your other files are on HDDs. You can get small SSDs very cheaply.

4) Your case is probably ok for the price, but there might be higher quality available for almost the same cost. You could check out NZXT S340 for example. [edit] There is no slot for optical drive in S340, by the way.

5) Your pick for the CPU cooler is good for the price, but I'm not sure it's huge leap from the default cooler of your 2700X (which is fairly good I hear). Maybe you could use the default cooler for a while and then upgrade it later to a top-tier cooler if your temperatures or noise are not good enough.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How are my temps?"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

The limit of safe temperature for your CPU is around 95C and 70-80C is fine under stress. 35C is great if your room temperature is around 25C, since even powerful watercoolers might run around 30-35C while idle or light usage.

The same goes for your GPU. Anything below 90C is ok and most cards are safe capped around 82C by default. That means your 63C at load is good. If you don't limit your fps, you will probably get 99% load and higher temperatures, and it's still normal. Your idle temp of 42C is also great, since 45-50C is typical for your card.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Getting Windows for free."

  • 25 months ago
  • -1 points

YES there is, despite all these "no" answers.

Option #1: If you're an entrepreneur or startup, you can easily qualify for the free Microsoft Bizspark program. I got dozens of licenses from there, 100% free, including Win10 Pro, Windows Server 2016 and Office 2016 Pro Plus. Bizspark itself doesn't cost anything either.

Option #2: If you're an university student, it is quite possible your school has a agreement with Microsoft to allow students to get free Windows & Office licenses. Some years ago it was called MSDNAA, not sure what it is today.

Option #3: Almost same as #2 but though your employer. It's not uncommon to buy Windows or Office licences for 10-20 euros. Your employer probably buys large amounts of licences, so Microsoft extends the lower prices for employees as well.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Motherboard recommendations with a few constraints?"

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

ASRock AB350M Pro4 AM4 mATX is a motherboard that should have USB-C and fits your case and CPU. I don't have personal experience with this board so please double check before buying.

After you have added all the components to your part list, the recommended PSU wattage is shown in the top-right corner of the part list. It is recommended to buy higher capacity since more wattage means ease of mind, upgradeability and better efficiency. Usually 650-850W is enough for most builds and even lower might be just fine.

I recommend a PSU with modular cables, meaning you can only install the ones your components need. This means less clutter and more space inside your case. Your case can fit max 230mm PSU, so almost anything is good.

Another thing to consider in PSU is efficiency, which is marked with "80+ bronze" for example. Bronze is good, silver/gold/platinum are better and titanium is the best. Unless you're running your PC 24/7 with high power consumption and expensive electric bills, it doesn't matter much which you choose.

I have used many Seasonic PSUs in my builds, but other brands should be fine as well. Seasonic has the Prime-models if you want "the best" and "Fanless" models if you want silent. Both are in the higher price range though. Cheaper PSUs are also likely to serve you longer than the lifetime of your new build.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Gigabyte - Z370 AORUS Gaming 5 (rev. 1.0) and Corsair - H150i PRO"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

If I understood correctly, you have 4-pin headers in your motherboard but your fan only has holes for 3 pins.

As you noticed, they are compatible. The 4th pin is pulse width modulation (PWM), which is used to control the speed of the fan by sending pulses to the fan. In 3-pin connections the speed is controlled by variable voltage.

In most cases it doesn't matter if you use 3 or 4 pins to control the fan speed (or read the rpm), but if your fan has led lights, they might dim or brighten depending on the fan speed if you're using the 3-pin variant. This is because lower rpm also means lower voltage, meaning lower power entering the fan.

Comment reply on Ametista's Completed Build: Amethyst

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes, it looks beautiful and has great components, but I don't quite understand the featured picks on this site. There are probably 500 builds in b/w NZXT case with Kraken AIO and some leds behind the table (mine included), but what makes them stick out?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What power supply"

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

Memory vendors bin memory kits at their rated density. If an end-user combines memory kits to make up a higher density, the memory timings that each kit is programmed with are no longer valid or guaranteed to work. In fact, memory vendors themselves advise users not to combine kits.

That being said, I'm guessing identical sticks are likely to work, but it's not 100% certain.

More specific reasons for this are explained here, but it gets very technical. Personally I would go a kit of 2x 16GB or a kit of 4x 8GB.

And then the PSU. I agree with SuperSarah, 750W or 850W would be great because bigger surplus gives you ease of mind and usually higher efficiency. Some models run passively when the load is small enough. Since you have excellent components, I'm guessing you don't want the cheapest PSU either, so I could recommend Seasonic Prime Ultra for example.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Custom Laser Cutting Service"

  • 25 months ago
  • 3 points

While any vector software probably works, Inkscape or Illustrator is recommended because Ponoko uses templates based on the material sizes they have available.

Sculpteo for example is more flexible on the files, colors and maximum dimensions.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Custom Laser Cutting Service"

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

It was the first vector graphic for me too, but it's quite easy. Remember to double-check stroke thickness and color and there shouldn't be any problems. Don't try too small details unless it's attached to something bigger, or they will end up missing or burned away by the laser.

Good luck!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Custom Laser Cutting Service"

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

I used Ponoko to create my Blues Brothers build

In my photos you can see the following pieces from Ponoko:

  • black acrylic side panel with clear acrylic as window
  • a name plate from clear acrylic (I think this is exactly what you are doing)
  • black acrylic front panel part with custom fan hole and laser etched logo

I was very happy with the whole process and materials, but shipping/taxes/customs are not ideal for european customers (more than 50% of total price). I used the free Inkscape program to create the vector files.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Custom Acrylic(?) Light-up Panel"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

At least the laser cutting service Ponoko has two-layered acrylic, some of which are somewhat translucent after etching.

You can of course take two separate acrylic sheets and just glue them together. For example black layer cut to shape on top and thin white or clear under it. If you want the surface to be quite smooth instead of two layers, you can cut two "inversed" parts from different colors and put them together like a puzzle. (remember the laser cuts away a bit of the material, so some edge tweaking is required if you want tight fit)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Custom Acrylic(?) Light-up Panel"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

I would say there are two or three options to do this.

1) two-layered acrylic plate that has those lines laser etched, so that they let light through them. Lights need to be behind the plate. Success depends a lot on the material used.

2) clear acrylic plate that has lines etched and lights are in the border of the plate, so that they shoot light through the plate.

3) plate has lines made with perhaps reflective tape and lights are in front of the plate.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Machine Build for around AUD 2500. First time. Please help ASAP."

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

It's not overkill, but cheaper cpu should be enough as well (for example 8600). On gpu you could go 1070ti but not less in my opinion.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Thermaltake Riing 12 RGB fans not spinning on startup."

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

Such behavior usually means the speed of the fans is set too low. All fans are individuals, so some rpm might be enough to start one fan, while other one might stay stopped, even if it's the same model.

Try setting the fans to 100% and see if they run normally. If the do, you can then slow them down. Keeping a fan running requires less power than the initial startup, so you need to stop them completely before trying a lower rpm.

If that is not the case, the M.2 fan plug might not give your fans enough power. I'm guessing M.2 fans are usually small, so putting 3 large case fans with leds might take too much power.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "EXTREME BUDGET BUILD NEED SUGGESTIONS!!"

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

I knew you could run a PC under mineral oil, but didn't know you could sink it in a bath tub full of thermal paste and doritos...

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions?"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

I agree with LiamDyer, 16GB of ram is very very strongly recommended, though I know the prices are a bit high at the moment. Just today I saw my PC using over 14GB while only running web browser and one game.

You can of course upgrade later, but getting identical ram sticks might be difficult.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Machine Build for around AUD 2500. First time. Please help ASAP."

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

I don't see any big problems with your parts, but I would strongly recommend getting a SSD as a boot drive. You have a top-of-the-line (mainstream) CPU and GPU, so using HDD as boot drive is simply antiquated. I got my first SSD 9 years ago and even then they were ridiculously faster than HDDs, current ones are 10 times faster than old SSDs.

If you need to save money elsewhere, you should ask yourself: 1) do I need 2 TB of hard drive? (unless you have slow Internet connection, you might not) 2) do I need an optical drive? (I haven't used mine in 6 years, didn't even install one on my newest PC) 3) do I need a platinum certified power supply? (bronze, silver or gold -certified are cheaper, but you probably won't notice the difference in your electric bill)

I'm not saying you should give up all of those, since a cheap SSD doesn't cost much. I bought one for 40 euros (65 AUD).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How (TF) do I find out what (FN) cables I need?"

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

For your power cables, the easiest choice is a full cable kit. The compatible kit for your Corsair RMx can be found at this link: https://cablemod.com/product-category/full-cable-kits/?filter_series=c-series&filter_models=rmi-rmx

From there you only need to choose the color you want (I'm guessing white) and either modflex or modmesh. Both will work, but modflesh is a bit more flexible. Here you can compare the two (modmesh on the left, modflex on the right): https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/content_link/Inm8OEf3b4V4fKpK0pigqc17r2aLsPnYqhpsas1KGZtFG9QXGLpCuz7NacBVbPSM/file

If you want you can add a couple of sata cables as well, maybe external ones too (power cord and ethernet cable).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Laser cutting service"

  • 26 months ago
  • 1 point

For those looking for such service, I found Sculpteo from Europe. They seem to offer laser cutting with instant online quote, but I haven't ordered yet.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Laser cutting service"

  • 26 months ago
  • 1 point

At that price it's definitely something to check out, thanks. There's still the problem of ventilation, though.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Compatibility of this ram"

  • 26 months ago
  • 2 points

Manufacturers simply do not have enough time to test all possible rams with all motherboards. The QVL is a list of those rams they have tested to be working.

The chances are very high that any DDR4 of correct type would work with your motherboard and since G.Skill themselves list AB350 Pro4 in their QVL, I'd say the probability is quite 100%. There are also other G.Skill RGB rams in the motherboard QVL, such as F4-3200C14D-32GTZR, so I'm guessing there shouldn't be any problems.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Case with room for the Asus f2a55-m/m11bb/dp"

  • 26 months ago
  • 2 points

For that price and mATX motherboard, you could check out the Thermaltake Versa H15 or CoolerMaster N200. Naturally you can always get bigger too (full ATX), like Corsair Carbide 100R.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Best MicroATX case"

  • 26 months ago
  • 1 point

If you want small and cheap, I have to ask, would you be willing to go mini-ITX? If so, Coolermaster Elite 110 or 120 or 130 might be something you could check out. Their normal price is around €40 and I've seen campaigns as low as €20.

I have the smallest (110) as a home server, and it's indeed small and high quality in my opinion. It should fit 210mm GPU and 180mm normal PSU. I just use the integrated GPU so can't say more about that.

Comment reply on Merlac's Completed Build: Blues Brothers

  • 26 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks!

The cpu cooler is in stores at least in Finland, but to be honest it's not a very effective one.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "White cases"

  • 26 months ago
  • 1 point

All Phanteks cases should be high quality, but I have no personal experience with them.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "White cases"

  • 26 months ago
  • 1 point

S340 and S340 Elite are great cases, but airflow depends on your setup. At least the S340 Elite has dust filters in front and if you install a radiator there as well, not much air comes through (quietly). This should only be a problem if you have a hot GPU and you plan to OC it.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Tips for maintaining a pc"

  • 26 months ago
  • 3 points

In addition to dust removal, there isn't much that needs to be done unless you have a custom water cooling loop.

After few years fans will become louder, so you can change them if you want. The only exception is the power supply fan; NEVER open the PSU! Power supply can have lethal voltages even after being disconnected from the wall.

If you see increase in CPU temperatures and already checked everything else, you may also change thermal paste. This shouldn't be needed more often than once every 6 years or so.

If you use SSDs, software maintenance like defrag isn't needed. That being said, Windows gets a nice speed boost if you completely reinstall it every 2-4 years. You can then take the opportunity to change your boot drive as well, if you want.

Comment reply on Merlac's Completed Build: Aurora Borealis

  • 26 months ago
  • 3 points

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01L6O2NEE/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_awdb_t1_jKe0AbDMGFEVF

I hope that link works. Be warned though, not all units are identical, even when ordered from same url. My screen is powered through HDMI so I don't use the usb, but some models require the usb too.

The ports and cables are in the right side of the display (at least in my unit) and hidden under white electrical tape. The case has a hole there (also hidden by tape) so cables can go through to the backside.

It should be noted that the white plastic borders are not included with the screen by default.

Good luck with your build! :)

Comment reply on Merlac's Completed Build: Aurora Borealis

  • 26 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes, the rear fan slot on S340 Elite is 120mm.

Comment reply on Merlac's Completed Build: Aurora Borealis

  • 26 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks! The fan grill is from https://www.v1tech.com/

Comment reply on Merlac's Completed Build: Aurora Borealis

  • 26 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes, you can use M.2 and a HDD, or even just M.2.

That being said, I haven't installed a single internal HDD in almost 9 years, since I bought my first SSD (Intel X-25). Unless you need huge storage and you have a tight budget, I would suggest SSD only. Also remember that M.2-drive has less noticeable speed gain over SSD versus SSD over HDD, so SSD is usually good enough for almost any build.

(HDDs are still a fair choice for external NAS-drives for example)

Comment reply on Merlac's Completed Build: Aurora Borealis

  • 26 months ago
  • 1 point

It doesn't bother me, quite the opposite. That black&white photo of my support bracket was shared at Asus ROG instagram, where it got almost 13000 likes in 4 days, so I suppose someone else likes it too.

The good thing about brackets is they can be as simple & cheap as you want, or you can easily make or order a custom one to fit your build theme. V1tech brackets are usually around 29 dollars (https://www.v1tech.com/product-category/gpu-support-brackets/) but I bet you can find much cheaper versions too. That amount of plastic or wood costs next to nothing.

To be honest, my GTX1070Ti is so heavy it sags even with the bracket, so I can imagine it would be quite horrible without it. The downside is it partly occupies 3 pci-e slots in addition to 2 slots of the gpu and 1-ish of the gpu backplate, so my ATX-case/board only has room for the sound card and nothing else.

Comment reply on tiger1998tiger's Completed Build: Aurora Mk II

  • 26 months ago
  • 2 points

I can honestly say nice build, because it seems I accidentally built surprisingly similiar :D https://pcpartpicker.com/b/kYRJ7P

The name, the case, CPU, cooler, sleeving kit, sound card, headphones, even Antlion... great minds think alike :)

Comment reply on Merlac's Completed Build: Aurora Borealis

  • 26 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes, you can buy an internal usb connector cable or even an internal adapter without the cable part. They are usually only 2-5 euros/dollars.

That being said, looping the cable outside the case doesn't look as weird as it sounds, because it's still only small part of the mess behind a case. You can see two of them in this photo of mine: https://www.dropbox.com/s/2z3f8c6gpbntkih/20180322_170843.jpg?raw=1

The larger HDMI in the marked section goes to front/top panel for VR use. The info display HDMI is the tiny cable behind it.

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