add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube

Comments

Comments

Comment reply on Forum Topic "8700K sadness"

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

Unless you bought the chip to OC past 5GHz, your games will not mind the 400MHz loss in clock speed. You could flip on eBay as well and try out another one...

Comment reply on Forum Topic "8700K sadness"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Unless you bought the chip to OC past 5GHz, your games will not mind the 400MHz loss in clock speed. You could flip on eBay as well and try out another one...

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Urgent help, old x299 mini itx, small case, need cpu cooler"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you, ordered it. I think I can live without OC'ing the i7-7820x. I am not doing anything time critical with it, GPU will be doing most lifting. Thank you.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ryzen 1700 with RTX 2060 now vs. 3600 with 1660ti later"

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

Agreed, there is always something better coming out tomorrow. If we wait for tomorrow to come, then when it does, we will conclude that the tomorrow of tomorrow will see something even better coming out. Result, we live in perpetual tomorrow land and do not end up owning or doing anything.

Purchase products of today so that they may be enjoyed tomorrow.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What video card do i upgrade to?"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Wow did not know the price differences between the NVMe 3.0 x 4 drives were so huge, like night and day.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What video card do i upgrade to?"

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

You could try an m.2. 2280 ssd, preferably one like the Samsung 970 Evo. Very fast drive.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How is a 97o in 2019 for 75"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

1440p @ 30fps+ with GTX 970. Yeah most titles but those that run poorly there are tweaks to settings you can make. Personally when you upgrade your monitor, upgrading the GPU is never a bad idea.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How is a 97o in 2019 for 75"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

GTX 970, good enough for 1080p gaming. Considerably better than the GTX1050Ti but a little below the GTX 1060. Considerably below the GTX1160.

The majority of titles will hit 60fps or better high settings with the GTX 970, some titles will require a few tweaks to run at 60fps or better. So yes, it is still an adequate card for 2019. If you have a 1080p monitor, for $75, it is a good purchase.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ryzen 5 1600 such a low price currently worth it with the 3000 series coming out?"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Grab the Ryzen 5 1600, your games will run just fine whether it is 1st generation or 3rd generation. The price is a steal.

If the ryzen 5 1600 with a radion 580 8gb, 16 gb ddr4 3200 on a b450 tomahawk would be able to play current game titles like assassins creed, far cry, etc on high graphics on 1080p?

Yes, certainly for Far Cry 5 and the vast majority of titles. Be warned that Assassin's Creed Odyssey is a very demanding title and will tax all GPUs regardless of settings. You may not hit 60fps across the board with this title. Even 1080Ti/RTX2080 will hitch frames at 1080p.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Will 3rd gen ryzen utperform intel?"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Truthful Answer = We do not know yet.

Answer Based on Rumors = AMD will have narrowed the gap, core per core, thread per thread with Intel. Conversely many anticipate that 3rd Gen Ryzen will outperform Intel across the board, core per core. The lower end Ryzen 3 will be 6c/12t and perform like a i7-8700K according to some rumors. That would be astonishing for a chip that costs three times less. I personally do not believe this rumor but it is possible it may trade blows with an i5 coffee lake. The mid range Ryzen 3600X will be an 8c/16t and it is expected to trade blows with the i9-9900K for half the cost. Many folks believe it is highly probable that it will outperform it by 10-15%. Not bad for a mid range chip. This rumor I could believe. The new Ryzens will also feature 12c/24t and 16c/32t chips with all the new perks. The expectation is these will derail Intel's high performing x299 chips, for half or less the cost. Again, there may be truth to these rumors although the release could potentially invalidate AMD's Threadripper series. I am on the fence with this rumor.

Reality = Spoilers and Rumors are just that. Some work out true, some half truth's, and some blatant falsehoods. Personally I think Ryzen 3rd Gen will be a similar upgrade from 1st-2nd gen. A very nice improvement, not Earth Shattering. But think of it this way - Ryzen 2700X was a very nice upgrade on the 1700X, approx 10-15%. If the next gen 8c/16t shows another 10% improvement (likely), then we are looking at a chip that would certainly trade blows with an i7-7820X and possibly the i9-9900K. All for the paltry price of less than $300 given it is widely expected that the 8core chip will be part of the Ryzen 5 lineup. Will it force current Ryzen 7 2700X or i9-9900K owners to ditch their chips for the Ryzen 5 3600X? Probably not.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Help! Radeon or GeForce (newbie here)"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Decide on the monitor you want, GPU will follow. At 1080p or 1440p, the GPU choice, AMD vs Nvidia, is just personal preference, you lose nothing with an appropriate card. Just be sure you understand gsync vs freesync and how that might impact your GPU choice. Nvidia at the moment can run both, AMD is freesync only.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Does RAM speed affect video editing more than gaming?"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

3000MHz DDR4 on Mobo that supports up to 2666MHz speed?

Nothing bad will happen, just means you will not be able to get 3000MHz out of that RAM on that motherboard. You will get 2666MHz however. The assumption here is Intel Chipset and not a Z/X series Intel motherboard.

Performance loss? Difference between 2666 and 3000 will be application dependent, generally peanuts for majority of them.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Help! Radeon or GeForce (newbie here)"

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

The end product of a gaming PC is what you observe on the monitor. The monitor itself will be an important factor in deciding on a GPU that is well matched to your build. Presuming you have/will get a 1080p monitor to start yourself with, the RX 580 is a pretty solid GPU. Price to performance ratio at 1080p, it is hard to beat. Just double check with the monitor whether Gsync or Freesync. If Freesync, you will be good to go with the RX 580. Gsync will be better served with Nvidia - in that case go for 1160Ti.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "better option video card for this build?"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Nope, whomever recommended this list did a pretty good job. You could drop down to an RX580 GPU and be within your budget range.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Good mid-tier GPU suggestions?"

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

1440p 90fps is a challenge needing a card greater than your budget allows.

1080p 90fps within your budget, GTX 1070/1070Ti, GTX 1160Ti, RTX 2060. Some titles will not hit 90fps but will hit over 60fps.

* Assumption, ultra/high settings, demanding AAA title. There are of course many titles that will run at over 60fps with a 1060/RX580,90 etc...

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Can I add extra thermal pads to GPU?"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Keep the thermal pads, good chance one day you upgrade GPU and liquid cooling

Comment reply on bucketofcrud12's Completed Build: March Upgrade

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Got it :-)

Comment reply on bucketofcrud12's Completed Build: March Upgrade

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Awesome job and excellent PC, great aesthetics and components. Definitely will slay your 1080p/144Hz monitor, no sub 100fps gaming for you :D.

GPU seems a bit pricey though, I am guessing you bought it during the peak of the mining craze. I recall building a new PC back then, ended up getting the Titan XP since it was cheaper than a 1080Ti at the time!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "i5 9600k or i7 8700k?"

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

Oh do not get me wrong, the 860 Evo 2.5" SSD is a fantastic storage device and the 1TB model is on many folks bucket list. If you already have it, keep it, do not bother getting an HDD unless you need the extra space. I was just floating the HDD larger storage as an idea. I presume you have not installed the OS yet, in that case, do purchase an M.2. 2280 NVMe SSD like this one: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/dkHRsY/samsung-970-evo-250gb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-mz-v7e250bw. It installs on the motherboard itself, blazing fast, and a great place to keep your OS and your most used programs. Well worth the purchase. Once you install it, be sure to hook up the 860Evo to the Sata 1 slot since usually Sata 0 gets used by the M2 Drive.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Rtx 2070 or 2080 for my first build"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Oops did not notice such a big performance discrepancy between RTX 2080 and 2070 at 1440p. I guess the numbers I had in my head were 4K, obviously a different proposition entirely. I guess then the 2080 is a worthwhile purchase for a 1440p 144Hz monitor. 20fps is quite a lot actually.
True there are other hobbies way more expensive than PC's you build....

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What Graphics Settings?"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Bump the RAM to 16GB for an extra $21 https://pcpartpicker.com/product/FNprxr/gskill-aegis-16gb-2-x-8gb-ddr4-3000-memory-f43000c16d16gisb Slightly over $600 budget, slightly....

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ryzen 3"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

The difference is modest, you will not notice it for gaming or streaming. 2200g does have the Vega 8 APU though. You do not need it but it could be useful if your GPU kicks the bucket. Black screen, you at least have a way of getting a video output without having to purchase a new GPU right away just to troubleshoot. For an extra $10 or so, it is probably worth the measly cost for something you likely will never need. An insurance policy in event of GPU failure.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "i5 9600k or i7 8700k?"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

TBH, both CPU's would be excellent choices. For a machine that will be predominantly used for gaming, i5 is a good choice.

Alterations to your Build:

  • I would get a lower end motherboard. You do not need a high end Z370 motherboard for gaming. A mid tier Z370 will work just fine. There are some nice perks with higher end motherboards but most folks do not need or utilize them.

  • I would get an M2 2280 Nvme drive for fast OS boot and storage. Samsung 970 EVO @ 256 GB enough. The 1TB 2.5" SSD you have listed is a good 2nd drive but non-essential. I consider them a luxury you can live without - particularly if you invest in a much cheaper HDD.

  • If you are a gamer with a lot of Steam/GOG/Origin etc games, get a 2TB or bigger 5400RPM/7200RPM HDD. Nothing too fancy, store your games on there, have them all downloaded, and then move / copy installation to faster drive as and when you play them. Some folks use external HDD for this purpose, your call.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ryzen 3"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

GTX 970 tremendously outperforms the integrated GPU's of these chips, you do not need them. You will not need a better GPU for Fortnite either. For your build, I would look more toward Ryzen 5 2600.

Ryzen 3000? Initial Summer release, probably July 2019.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "i3-8100 or Ryzen 5 2600?"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Nothing wrong with the i3, a fantastic and well priced chip, but Ryzen 5 is an easy win for the relatively modest extra cost. If you need to offset cost, you can save $15 on the Mobo moving to different brand. PSU can also be trimmed off $15 or so moving to something else. While an 80+ gold 650W is something of a sweet spot, a Bronze will run that entire build without breaking sweat.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "1050Ti to 1660Ti"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

The upgrade to to the 1160Ti will be worth it. PSU at 450W is enough, your power draw probably will not exceed 300W.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "RIP my 980 Ti"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah the 980Ti is still a great card, sorry to hear it broke. It would certainly have given you high performance at 1080p for the foreseeable future, staving your hand for a gen or two before upgrading. The RTX 2060 is a nice upgrade though, should keep you going for a long while.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Rtx 2070 or 2080 for my first build"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

It all comes down to performance targets as a means to justifying costs. 2080Ti is, in context, a good purchase for someone wishing to game well at 4K. $1300, ouch, but you get what you pay for. 2070 is an awesome purchase for a 2K gamer at a competitive $500 price. 2080 is an inbetweener, hard to justify the extra $300 for a 2K gaming rig, hard purchase if you want to play ultra settings 4K at 60fps or better..

Of course, PC building hobby is horribly expensive, I wish I had different interests....

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Rtx 2070 or 2080 for my first build"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

1080Ti for $480 is a steal, good job getting it at that price. Still one of the best cards out there.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Rtx 2070 or 2080 for my first build"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Both cards are excellent for 1440p 144Hz. I think, for what you get, that the RTX 2080 is overpriced. $800 for many models, no thanks. It does perform better than the RTX 2070, but at 1440p, it will be $300 extra for approx 10-15fps difference. I would be tempted to go with the RTX 2070.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "RIP my 980 Ti"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Well, the 980 Ti and the 1070 essentially traded blows performance wise, there was little between them. 1160 performs similar to these cards. The 2060 slots between 2070 and 1070 and is nicely priced. The 2070 is considerably more expensive and it might be hard to justify it for 1080p. Conclusion: RTX 2060.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "16GB or 32GB for my build"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes a matched set of RAM is the best way of doing it and easiest - good chance XMP will hit the mark. No guarantee this will be the case buying two separate sticks. However, there is no issue doing it this way, I figure if you are willing to take several hours to build a PC, install a nice liquid loop for cooling, you also have the time and wherewithal to tweak settings old school if you must.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "GPU price difference vs output"

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

RTX 2060 is the best card of the batch you listed but is approx half your build budget. Black Friday is not going to impact this aspect in a tremendous way.

Your monitor will always be the deciding factor. All GPU's you listed will game well at 1080p for instance. The choice of better vs worse, pricey vs less pricey comes into play at less forgiving resolutions or refresh rates. Adjust your budget (within reason), choices, and compromises considering this.

As an example, lets say, hypothetically, one owns a 1080p monitor with 60Hz refresh. The best card, in theory is still the RTX 2060 and it is still the most expensive card of the quartet. The best card for the build though is the RX 580 - it will run 99.9% of titles out there at highest settings and be a good complement to the refresh rate of the monitor. In many ways, one is not compromising much by dropping down to the lowest performing card. One has to consider Refresh Rates, Resolution, Freesync, Gsync and so on. Even color fidelity and response times of the monitor will impact the end result of what your PC is doing. The monitor should be dictating choice of card beyond raw numbers or aesthetics. At the end of the day, it is the accessory which gives you immediate evidence of the task your PC is performing. It is the end product of the information flow.

Forget about longevity / future proofing. Term gets used a lot, it is conceptually meaningless. Get the card you can afford and the one that will best complement your gear/set up - in this order of importance. Worry about tomorrow when tomorrow comes.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "16GB or 32GB for my build"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

I have done this plenty of times, install two sticks, add another two identical sticks later. No problemo, you are nearly safe doing so. Only once I had an issue and the problem was 99.9% certainly a mislabeled stick of RAM - i.e. the assembler slapped on the wrong sticker.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Crossfire or Sli with and and Nvidia"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Nope, different chips, architecture, drivers, and so on. Not possible to SLI/crossfire both. You can only crossfire or sli compatible cards - i.e. two GTX 1080's, two RX 580's and so on. You cannot even SLI GTX 1080Ti with, say, a GTX 1080.

Fair warning.... SLI/Crossfire is a waste of money and is not guaranteed to work/scale well with every game - most games do not scale or scale poorly with SLI/Crossfire. I would not bother for the sake of the few games that do show significant improvement with two GPU's.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Still struggling."

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

Moving from ATX to mini-itx, you will be switching motherboards no matter what. Probably will have to reinstall OS. Opens up the possibility of moving to different chipsets/chips.

Strictly speaking, you do not really have to upgrade your CPU with any urgency, right now it is still a very solid well performing chip. Get latest mobo X470 or B450 in ITX form, keep your old CPU for the time being, and hold tight until you see what Zen 2 looks like. Decide then whether to stick or swim. Moving from r5-1600 to i5-9600k/i7-8700k is a lateral move, you do not gain too much of real world performance despite benchmarking tools implying a 25-35% jump. If you are going to move, consider upgrading to 8c/16t - Ryzen 2700X or i9 or one of the Zen 2 chips.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What 2 way sli or crossfire GPU has better fps and price than a single RTX 2060? (GeForce only)"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

If by standard monitor you refer to 1080p 60Hz then the sweet spot would be something like the GTX 1060 6GB (Nvidia still have not completed their lineup but the 1160Ti would be the newer card to check out). AMD wise, RX 580 will serve well.

SLI wise your price is too low, even for Maxwell Gen. You need two cards. You might hit your pricing with the GTX 970 in SLI (it has been a few years since I had Maxwell, I do not recall if the 970 was SLI capable). The RTX2060 would likely smoke this SLI set up. GTX 980 in SLI would also likely lose out, performance-wise, to the majority of titles against a single RTX card. Performance wise it does not make sense to SLI weaker cards unless you only game on titles that do scale well with SLI. You will also have to factor in power. Two 970's/980's in SLI would have a significantly higher power draw than a single RTX. In any case, if you game on a 1080p 60Hz monitor, you will not notice a significant difference between a single GTX 980 or RTX 2060 - both cards being capable of delivering a 60fps or better gaming experience at 1080p, matching or exceeding the refresh rate of your monitor. So in many a sense, it hardly matters in this context.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What Graphics Settings?"

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

I would recommend switching the GPU out and bumping the RAM to 16GB. If you are willing to add $150'ish to the build, upgrade to the RX 570 GPU and definitely look at 16GB RAM. Nothing has to be too fancy RAM wise, but if your son is going to be playing a lot of games, wide variety, some definitely run choppy on 8GB RAM.

What you currently have build wise, graphics settings, 1080p, mixed medium and low. Depends on the game, older games will run well on higher settings, newer AAA titles like Assassin's Creed Odyssey or Final Fantasy XV will run lower than 60fps at 1080p on all but lowest settings, even then, one may need to drop the resolution. Fortnite and many online/esports titles will run pretty well with the RX560 and the 8GB RAM.

If you take my recommendations, add $150 to build cost, maybe increase PSU to next tier model, i.e. 500W, there will not be a single game out there that will not run at 60fps or better at mixed medium-high settings at 1080p. In fact, the vast majority of games will exceed 60fps on highest settings.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "16GB or 32GB for my build"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Nothing wrong at all with 32GB, it is getting more and more common nowadays. I have never used your software but if it eats up RAM, give it RAM to eat up in that case. 16GB is enough for 99% of gaming/casual use scenarios but those of us that code, develop, simulate, 16GB of RAM is peanuts. In my case, 32GB is barely enough. At the end of the day, in this game, you get what you pay for. If you can afford 32GB of RAM, and it is necessary for your use, then not installing it is to the detriment of your enjoyment and professional use of your PC.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Intel i9 9900k or AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2950x for Video Editing"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Extremely hard question. It is also a choice between a limited albeit functional Z390 chipset vs the Professional X399 chipset. It is also the choice between a build that may cost $4000 vs one that could escalate to over $5000. One build gives you a large amount of options, PCIe lanes, larger RAM, and so on, the other is streamlined but has all the functionality you need for most usage scenarios out there. Personally, based on the programs that you plan to be using not scaling well enough with cores to justify the extra expenditure, I would be tempted to go with the i9-9900K build. As long as 64GB of RAM is enough and you do not intend to be adding sticks in the future, you will probably be well set up with the Intel z390 build.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Gaming cpu ?"

  • 13 months ago
  • 3 points

Two answers here:

  1. Best bang for buck - AMD with their Ryzen 5 2600X.

  2. Best performing - i9-9900K for more than double the price of the best bang for buck.

Difference between i9-9900K and Ryzen 5 2600X is price and perhaps bragging rights. Gaming performance, not significant enough to be meaningful (except perhaps at 1080p 144Hz plus where Intel will outperform handily but that aspect will also depend on the GPU, given all things contribute to the system performance). Multitasking, not much difference for non workstation loads.

Gaming: The single biggest difference is the GPU - upgrading the GPU has a much larger impact on performance than upgrading a CPU. You cannot really go wrong with Intel or AMD. You cannot go wrong with any 6 core or 8 core CPU by both companies - you will have a terrific CPU for gaming and general multimedia use. Heck even a 4 core i3 or Ryzen 3/5 will hold it's own in vast majority of games.

Truth be told, there really is no such thing as a gaming CPU. All CPU's can be used for a variety of applications, gaming being one of them ;-)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Will AMD be able to recover market share after their recent endeavors?"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Intel's dominance on CPU side is not heavily correlated with individual CPU sales through Newgg/Amazon to prospective PC builders, who are by far in a minority group. Intel dominance could very well persist due to existing contracts, mobile market, and so on. AMD could very well take over Intel in the PC building market though. On this front, AMD has brought themselves back in the game with Ryzen. I would not dismiss AMD as a serious player with Ryzen 2, they benched their 8core/16thread 7nm CPU against Intel's best 8core/16thread in the i9-9900K and came out ahead. With further tweaks until a release date later this year, it could certainly outperform by a wider margin. Thing is, this CPU is the purported Ryzen 5 3600X, basically their mid-range CPU. Mid range beating Intel's top range, future looks very bright for AMD. The Ryzen 7 3700X is purportedly going to be 12core/24thread with Intel having no answer to it - at least not in short term.

GPU wise? Nothing to stop AMD from resurrecting this side of their business. I am sure their R&D team are fervently working at it. Might not be this year or next, but you can bet your bottom dollar AMD will have their "Ryzen" moment with their GPU's as well. Do not forget, next gen consoles by Sony and Microsoft will be sporting AMD hardware. If stats are to be believed, the PS5 will be packing as much power as a current Ryzen 7 2700X and RTX 2080Ti and will be due for release next year at a purported price of $400. Quite impressive really.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Why would you buy 1080 Ti over a 2080 Ti at this point?"

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

If the 1080Ti is the same price as the 2080Ti then that implies low stock and price reflecting rarity. On used market I do not believe that this is the case at all. Basically, right now, the 1080Ti is a redundant purchase at or greater than MSRP. The 1080Ti is still one of the top cards out there and worth buying.... for the right price below MSRP.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "I'm upgrading my GPU and need advice!"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Put this way, you have two pipes connected, one pipe is fat, other is skinny. Which pipe would be setting the flow rate? Same analogy for PC hardware. You might have a GPU/CPU that can push 120fps but your monitor only refreshes at 60Hz. Limiting factor here is your monitor. Conclusion, new high performing GPU/CPU are overkill, you could get away with lesser hardware/what you already have and save money. No need to install a V8 in a lawnmower if all you are going to do is mow grass.

Upgrade your monitor and GPU. If you want to enjoy 120+ fps gaming, it is essential to have a monitor that can output that. The GPU (and perhaps even CPU) upgrade might be necessary. For 1080p, an i5/i7 and RTX2060 will hit the sweet spot of cost/performance.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Which CPU priced around 100-150 would be good to pair with an RX470?"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

i5-8400 is a great CPU but it will not work on your motherboard.

Given how things have worked out, I would say the i7 would be your best bet - most expensive but you get 4 fast cores and 8 threads. It will serve you well for the forseeable future. The 4 core 4 thread processor, while still perfectly functional today, might come up short in some scenarios. Right now, not too much, in near future, who knows.

i7-7700 i7-6700

Is where I would look for your build. You will be paying over $200 used.

i5-7600/i5-6600 would be my third choice, you will pay approx $200 used and will likely find more "K" chips than unlocked, probably paying a little extra.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "I'm upgrading my GPU and need advice!"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

FF XV is a very demanding game irrespective of resolution. TBH, given the resolution / refresh of your monitor, the RX 470 is a somewhat decent matchup. You may consider bumping the GPU to the 1060/1070 level but once you start bumping the GPU upwards, it would be recommended to upgrade your monitor to higher refresh rates. My advise: If money permits, upgrade your monitor to 1080p/144Hz (will cost approx $350) and then invest in a newer GPU like the RTX2060 (approx $350). You do not absolutely have to upgrade the monitor, but the frame rates your eye will see will be limited by the monitor in most games out there. Just to reiterate the first point - FF XV is a very demanding game. It is pushing the limits of all hardware it encounters, even the highest end rigs out there.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "which GPU is better? MSI GeForce GTX 980 GAMING or msi rx 570 gaming x"

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

The GTX 980 performs similarly to the GTX 1060, perhaps a little more powerful. It certainly is a step up on the RX 570, although if you are just gaming at 1080p 60HZ, either card will do the job, get whatever is cheaper. I am assuming you are looking at both cards since you have the opportunity for a good deal that is hard to pass up on.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Which CPU priced around 100-150 would be good to pair with an RX470?"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

i5-7600, i7-7700 would be worth a look. i5-7500 is another possibility. You can also use prior gen Skylake on the B250 as well. In this case, i5-6600 and i7-6700 would be worth a look.

You can of course consider the unlocked processors as well (denoted by a K) but be aware you will not be able to utilize them to their full potential on the B250 motherboard. Price wise, you are more likely to get a better deal on the locked processors. They will also have lower TDP as well, you might be able to reuse the cooler you currently have.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Which CPU priced around 100-150 would be good to pair with an RX470?"

  • 13 months ago
  • 3 points

Cheapest Upgrade will be to keep the motherboard you have (save money) and get the KabyLake i5/i7. An i5 - 7600 might fall into your $200 range used. Either chips will be a nice upgrade on the Pentium, which itself is a nice little chip.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Which i7?"

  • 13 months ago
  • 3 points

You will not notice the difference in gaming. Differences are going to be slight/nonexistent at 1440p/4K. At 1080p, the newer i7 seems to be slightly faster but not by much. Workstation uses it will depend what you doing, some workloads do scale with hyperthreading, others do not. You cannot go wrong with either chip.

Sort

add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube