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New Tech? How about Old tech Reused?

ZFGeek

7 months ago

Am I the only one that feels new tech isn't really new anymore? Like with Proccessors, all we ever get is more cores or 100 mhz faster clock speeds, but no actual "new" technology is coming out. Its all reused and rebranded. The only truely new thing is folding displays, and they aren't faring well right now. I'm about ready for something brand new, never created before. We haven't had a moment like that since the original iPhone came out(at least from what I've noticed). I honestly think that technology has hit a barrier in advacement, and a technological discovery soon will break that barrier, allowing us to see new and amazing tech we've only dreamed of. If you made it to the end of this, thanks for reading. I've been thinking about this for a while. If anyone has any objections to this rant, please, I'd like to hear them.

Comments

  • 7 months ago
  • 3 points

I feel like I've typed this post at least 3 times already.

Even 6 years ago the idea of self-driving cars on our roads was just an idea. Tesla introduced the very first iteration of their autopilot in 2014, and the only people who had Tesla's back then were the super rich (now you only have to be mildly rich lol). Even back then, nobody was prepared for what we have now which is 100% self-driving cars debuting on our roads.

Also around that time, nobody had ever reused a rocket first stage after a successful cargo delivery to orbit. That only happened less than 4 years ago; since then SpaceX has recovered at least 40 boosters, and reuses them regularly.

Consumer grade VR and AR has only hit the market in the last ~5 years, and for most of that it was not accessible for the average person. The Oculus Quest is the first self-contained, fully-featured, relatively affordable, VR headset that you can just buy and put on and go. It just launched last month. Think about that. When the iPhone came out, consumer friendly VR headsets were still science fiction and virtually nobody had even heard of AR. Now your iPhone can 'project' AR into the space around you.

We've got sunglasses that project a HUD directly onto your retina now.

In 2017 we got the first console that you can just grab off your entertainment unit, without even pausing, and just keep playing on the go. Nobody even saw that coming in the years prior. Nobody even knew they wanted that lol.

Although it is still early days and largely gimmicky at this time, we are for the first time getting games featuring real time raytracing. This is something that has been pursued for a long time. It might seem like "just a graphics setting" in a game, but this fundamentally changes the way lighting is done in games. It's a big development from a game graphics perspective and with the announcements of the next gen consoles, it seems like everyone is going to go in on this.

Even talking about processors, saying 'all we ever get is more cores or 100 mhz faster clock speeds' is not really fair or accurate. Prior to 2017 we weren't getting more cores, at all. We were getting Intel drip feeding clock speed and IPC gains through iteration and the occasional die shrink, since like 2010. Zen just opened the doors on mainstream consumers getting high core count, high performance chips.

Look at AI. In 1996 it took a literal supercomputer to win a game of Chess. Now you can run AI on consumer hardware, anyone can download applications to get started. You can teach an AI character to walk in 3D with zero animation required, using any modern GPU. Now professionally developed AI's are beating people in games as complex as StarCraft 2 and DOTA 2.

Etc. Lots of new tech, happening all the time. Accelerating even. Remember that the iPhone was brand new just 12 years ago, and couldn't do nearly anything it can do today (it didn't even have an app store). 12 years before that, the majority of people didn't even have a computer in the home, let alone a cellular phone. 12 years before that, America had essentially never heard of Nintendo, and the "Internet" was the realm of the DoD and colleges/science researchers. 12 years before that the word Internet didn't even exist and most people in America didn't even have color TVs. 12 years before that nobody had ever been to orbit and the idea of communicating around the globe with a personal handheld device was science fiction. That's only 60 years. That's less than the average age of the Senate in the last Congress. Trump was already as old as the average PCPP user 60 years ago.

  • 7 months ago
  • 2 points

We've got sunglasses that project a HUD directly onto your retina now.

That sounds bad for your eyes.

Where can I buy one so I can have a Halo hud?

  • 7 months ago
  • 2 points

Don't worry. They'll figure out how to beam it straight into your optic nerve once the eyes go.

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

https://www.engadget.com/2019/02/14/north-focals-smart-glasses-price-cut/

Check it out.

Also google "Intel Vaunt". This company bought Intel's original tech.

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

I guess so, I just feel that technology advancement is really starting to slow down a bit. I don't know, maybe its just me....

  • 7 months ago
  • 2 points

I don't think you are alone on this feeling, but the feeling is wrong. When you are twice your current age, you're going to look back and go "holy ****" at the things that you can do in that time compared to now. I do this pretty regularly when I think back to pre-drone, pre-internet, pre-virtual reality, pre-smartphone days.

(Assuming humanity hasn't destroyed itself by twice your current age)

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

“Assuming humanity hasn't destroyed itself by twice your current age”

Well, even with all the panic through the years, it hasn’t happened yet! (unless you want to count that time with the Roman Empire)

  • 7 months ago
  • 2 points

I honestly think that technology has hit a barrier in advacement

in some ways, sure. like with many things, it isnt always 100% original, usually technology develops slowly and over time, like it basically always has. there was a time in computing when things developed more quickly, for sure.

a technological discovery soon will break that barrier, allowing us to see new and amazing tech we've only dreamed of.

no offense, but that is anyone's guess. it might or it might not. My guess is that things will develop at about the same rate that they have for the last hundred years or so. at least we have good ol AMD not just refreshing 12nm and instead actually moving forward to 7nm. thats gotta count for something.

[comment deleted]
  • 7 months ago
  • 2 points

I guess you're right. I've fallen to be one of those people.

  • 7 months ago
  • 3 points

Let us observe a moment of silence for our fallen brethren.

Recognizing failure is a step many do not take, so you're ahead of the pack.

[comment deleted]

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