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Ryzen 2600 or wait for Zen2?

Calculonne
  • 13 months ago

As simple as the title states. I was about to wait for Zen2 but it's said to be coming in June, which is not exactly behind the corner. New series should bring, in addition to new architecture and manufacturing process, PCIe4 support. Don't know how much that would impact and if there are some drawbacks in buying right now (obsolete technology or else). Any ideas?

Comments

  • 13 months ago
  • 4 points

Its likely to be later then June. AMD still hasn't launched anything and in their reveal stated it was unfinished and still in development for clock speeds.

So you might as well get what you can now.

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

Get what you can now. Tech is always moving forward. If not Ryzen 3, then Intel's next gen, if not this, then Ryzen 4, so on and so forth. A CPU is not like a GPU, next gen will not be significantly better. The difference between 2080Ti and 1080Ti is large, the difference between Ryzen 1700X and 2700X is nowhere near as large, as will be the difference between 2700X and 3700X. A nice bump, 5 - 15 percent, that is it. The only reason why many are excited about the 3rd gen Ryzen is that it will mark the first time in a long time that AMD will, chip for chip, outperform Intel's chips. Whatever the case may be, the differences, manifest in real word, are usually small. A few percent. Ryzen 2nd gen is good enough now. Think this way - Ryzen 2700X is around 5 - 10% weaker than the i9-9900K. In real world it hardly matters. Ryzen 3700X will be around 5 - 10% stronger than i9-9900K. 10 - 20% improvement? A big deal in the CPU world, in real applications, not really that much of an impact. Gaming, hardly any difference. Some encoding/rendering applications, maybe the difference between waiting 1 minute and 1 minute and 10 seconds. You are good getting the Ryzen 2700X right now.

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

My main concern is about the motherboard. If I buy it now till what generation of ryzen will it be compatible? For sure the one coming, but unless I buy a high end mobo it won't support PCIe 4. What about processors? I fear that current mobos have still one gen left of forward compatiblity whereas the next generation of mobos (AM4 5xx) will ave much more. That may be a real world problem.

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

My main concern is about the motherboard. If I buy it now till what generation of ryzen will it be compatible?

Yes although there will be some level of lowered support for features.

For sure the one coming, but unless I buy a high end mobo it won't support PCIe 4.

It is actually the opposite. Manufacturers can rework BIOS so the first slot wired from the CPU can support Gen 4 so long as there are not splitters or redrivers, so any motherboard that is SLI capable will only support Gen 3 well the lower end models may be allowed by AMD to run at Gen 4.

The devil is in the details though as most boards the first slot wired from the CPU is the M.2, and anything else wired to the CPU will revert to Gen 3. Things like USB may downgrade in performance as they will need half the lanes on a 500 series chipset.

I fear that current mobos have still one gen left of forward compatiblity whereas the next generation of mobos (AM4 5xx) will ave much more. That may be a real world problem.

AM4 is being retired next year. Both 400 and 500 series motherboards are looking at end of life then with AMD moving on. Which is also another reason not to bother waiting since either way you are dead ended.

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

The problem is we don't know what's going to be released then - we know the model names etc. but not what they can handle although it is supposedly 'compatible.' I am looking at the same issue myself as I want the 3000 series of cpu but what to do about the mobo. Imho, just try to guess as best you can - I would get a good B450 or X470 but not the 'most expensive' or 'best of the best' - because we don't know. But, at the very least or if it comes down to it, you can always just sell the cpu and mobo or one of the two - and upgrade to the next gen.
The rest of the components can be moved over or still used. On the other hand, maybe buying something like a CH7 makes it more likely that a 3000 series cpu can be added without any concern. But, I think we might want the upgraded features of the X570 chipset at some point so I don't know whether it makes sense to spend $300+ on a mobo at this point.

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

One catch is that the next group of CPUs will feature an advance in silicon production, and we shouldn't expect to see another such advance for years. On the Intel side, Broadwell shipped in 2015 on 14nm (it was a year or two late). Intel has been saying "10nm is on track" since then, and claims that next year they won't pull the football away. And Snowy Cove (the biggest architectural update since Sandy Bridge) is only designed for 10nm (and above).

On the AMD side, TSMC is producing the "CPU" in 7nm (roughly equal to Intel 10nm, at least what Intel is trying to do and not that "shipping 10nm") while the "northside bridge" is on the same package produced by Global Foundries. While I'm sure AMD is working on a Zen3 (presumably for some sort of "7nm+" TSMC process (which I suspect will exist to lower the cost of the chips, and not affect performance).

It isn't clear how much more advanced AMD chips will be with the new TSMC process. I'd expect at least as much improvement as the Ryzen1xxx series to the Ryzen2xxx series, judging on the RX580->RX590 had a 15% clockspeed jump going from 14nm (ryzen1000) to 12nm (ryzen2000). Vega->RadeonVII had a 25% jump going from 14nm (Ryzen1000) to 7nm(ryzen3000). Don't forget that zen+ was more or less unchanged, while zen2 (Ryzen3000) will be architecturally adjusted to fit the new process.

That said, it isn't all that much on an absolute scale, but closing the single thread gap with Intel (at least until Snowy Cove ships) will at least make you feel you bought the right chip (obviously there will be some programs where they lead, others where Intel leads, but I expect the gap to be small).

I doubt PCIe4 will matter that much, unless you really hammer your I/O and really need your NVMe card as opposed to SATA. Every advance since the VL-bus replaced the ISA slot [yes, I am old] has been hyped by graphics cards as a "critical feature", but later analysis shows that running those cards at the old speeds shows little difference.

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

I've absolutely decided to wait for the new Ryzen chips. Maybe.

I'm looking at a Ryzen 2700 which is on sale at the moment for $230. If the R3Ks are available in June (not a sure bet, as Gilroar pointed out) and if the performance matches the leaked specs and prices (not a sure bet at all) then I'll be slightly worse off buying now. Like a year behind in technology but at a good price.

My main reason for waiting is that I can save up more money by June and hit the Fourth of July sales to get better deals on most or all of the components. It's a reason, but not necessarily a compelling one.

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

I would say depends on what you currently have, if you have a first gen Ryzen then wait, you won't see much of a performance jump between gen 1 and 2. If you're doing an entire system overhaul consider the Ryzen 1600, it's going for as low as $99, you'll get similar performance and then you'll have some money left over for when Zen2 launches.

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

I have an I5 4440 haswell. I bought it when AMD alternative was FX, which was really a poor compromise. As stated in another reply, my concern is about motherboard life. Currently available ones have for sure one gen left of forward compatibility, but I don't know if there are more. The AM4 5xx series will presumably have more room for future upgrades. So what to do?

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

If you can wait, wait. If you can't wait til June, get something like the 2600. Why are all these simple and ridiculous questions on this forum?

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