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alright...lets talk about these RTX 2060's....

jinthal

12 months ago

As someone who has been out of the high end gaming PC scene for awhile now.....and doesn't have a degree in a field that let me know all the leet bleeding edge info on these shiny new cards.....I, like many others defer to the experts on advice on what to pick up when specing out a new PC to build. I've watched the various videos with benchmarks and read the many threads titles 1070 vs 2060 etc, the opinions are all over the spectrum on which is a better buy. With the nifty ray tracing features but 2 gigs less RAM is the 2060 really what the average joe who is running 1080P displays...between 60hz and 144hz really wants? Even If i were to go out and buy new displays today...chances are they would be 1080p with higher refresh rates. There are 1070s at the exact same price point and some cheaper than the 2060s. educate me friends....truly....which is the better buy for gamers like myself and why?

Comments

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

Honestly the benchmarks are what they are even with 2gb less it easily outperforms the 1070.

And currently it's only $30usd more so the price isn't all that bad either.

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

It trades blows with the 1070Ti on many titles. Heck, it beats the GTX 1080 on a couple of titles and often gets within 5fps or so of the GTX 1080 on many. It is one heck of a GPU.

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

Warning: A lot of opinion that likely doesn't answer your overall question :p

I think a major driving factor in what people eventually choose isn't always frames. Cost is a big part (whether building a new PC or upgrading an existing one) and, often overlooked, the relative performance to the rest of the components in the system (ie. will this GPU be bottlenecked by the CPU or vice versa). Usually, the price points of the cards make the sit relatively well performance-wise next to the components.

With that said, here are factors I take when making a GPU decision that usually lead me to a logical model or smaller group:

  • What generation card is this? You may be the crazy enthusiast who always needs to have the latest generation (regardless if you are using it or not). I'll admit, I tried the RTX features with Battlefield V for all of 30 minutes and then turned them off (because I valued the frames over the visuals).
  • If I'm upgrading, will I have to upgrade other components to safely power the card or bring it to full potential (not being bottlenecked by an older CPU for example)? Sometimes you might need to upgrade the PSU to accompany the greater power draw / power port requirement (6 pin vs 8 pin or dual 8 pin vs single 8 pin for example). This then leads to the next point...
  • What is my cost ceiling? Can I afford a GPU costing $150? $500? $1500? $5000? Everyone is going to have a different ceiling. Usually you have some expectations (ie. if you are going for a specialty rendering GPU like a Nvidia Quadro or AMD FirePro you might have an expectation closer to $5000 than $500).
  • Will it safely support my game at the frame rate and resolution I plan to play at? Fortunately, games have settings we can usually tweak to better account for not having the top-of-the-line GPU or CPU. We've also got lots of benchmarks floating around and lots of support from forums like these to understand how a combo might perform. But if your target GPU and CPU combo appear to underperform your expectations it might make sense to wait and save up some more to raise your cost ceiling or lower expectations a bit.
  • What brand is it? I think there is a lot of brand loyalty in PC building. Your previous requirements might narrow down to a line like the 2060 or 1070 where you get to choose by a MSI or Asus and be thinking "ewww, MSI, I hated that MSI motherboard I had years ago, Asus all the way!".
  • What does it look like? These days, with all the RGB and windows, visual appeal is becoming a big factor! Though, it is usually lower on a GPU prerequisite than, say, a fan or CPU cooler.

The one word I always see thrown around these forums is "worth". It seems really strange to me to let others gauge worth for me. The idea of worth is fairly subjective and will be different for everyone.

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

If you could grab a 1070 for less than the 2060, go for it. If not, the 2060 is basically a 1070 Ti for $100 and 2GB VRAM less. It's also within 80-90% of the 2070's performance for at least $150 less. This RTX basically makes its case for anyone not willing to get the 2080 Ti.

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

+1, would you buy a 2070 given how well the 2060 is performing? I certainly would not. The gaming card choice is binary - 2060 or 2080 nowadays. 2080Ti at over $1200 with tax is off the table for most.

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

I'd buy none of them, unless a 2060 MaxQ laptop has good battery life.

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey Jinthal!

I was, or rather I am still, in the same boat as you. Hours of going through reviews and videos so on and so forth. Because although I have the money to go and get a 2080 ti or (insert 'bleeding edge kit name')...I only have that money because I am cheap.

I was compromising and settling with an RX 580-90 which I was seeing in the $300 to $350 range when taxes and shipping would be factored in. A lower performing card spec to spec wise, but still something I am sure would suit my needs for now. I got super lucky and spotted a 1070ti for $499 Canadian, new. I justified the extra $150 because it was over $200 off with this sale.

That said I knew what the specs / youtubers were saying as you do and yeah 100% you're in a position to compromise on price (up or down) and or performance (up or down) unless you get lucky.

I am by no means a pro on the matter, or at gaming, but I wanted an enjoyable PC experience for the first time in a decade AND feel I might have it. But at the end of the day for casual folks like ourselves MONEY and VALUE drives the hardest bargain. Not frame rates, RGB, or speeds.

From what I have seen (again, I will probably get stomped out for saying this) go with what wont break your bank in an others competitive (not necessarily even) playing field.

If you are in Canada/ or not there are still a couple 1070tis available in Calgary at Memory Express for $500. Its the Asus Cerberus 1070 ti and the sale is on till mid February.

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

If you are keen to explore new tech such as raytracing, then 2060 is a relatively good value investment to get you started. how many new games will have raytracing releasing this year is still unknow, my guess probably a handful. DLSS also an interesting tech to play with. however, if you don't care to explore bleeding-edge tech, and just want a GPU to play games in 1080p, as others has suggested, a GTX1070/TI or R580 is still the way to go …. given if their price has reasonable gap with 2060. If you can wait, Radeon 7 coming in Feb to look out for, but msrp seems to be on the high side; or wait for the green camp late feb release of a new GTX card that is speculated to be priced around $280.

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