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Anybody know where a guy can get a job?

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  • 19 months ago

I need to get a job to create the love of my life (the PC-- you know, one with actual capabilities, one that can watch youtube at 1080p60 and not only display one frame every 5 seconds. One with a not-punched screen. One where google chrome can hardly run with Discord and GeForce NOW in the background.) Anyways, anyone know where a 15-year-old can get a job? I know you guys are PC builders -and that's why I love this place, not people who have no time and look for jobs for people they don't even know, but I don't know where to start. I'm confused, and kind of am scared of rejection. Just suggestions are needed. Thank you in advance!

Comments

  • 19 months ago
  • 6 points

Put on a nice shirt, decent hair, and walk into places and ask for applications.

  • 19 months ago
  • 2 points

when you have neither

jk i'll try

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

Honestly just a regular OCBD and either some chinos or nice jeans would be fine at most places.

  • 19 months ago
  • 3 points

First job huh? Well, it's not easy, but keep your chin up and be prepared to be rejected.

Good places to look at places where you know there's a regular amount of people in and out, and alternatively where you may know someone who you can call a favor in for. My first job was working at a restaurant for a friend's parents, and it certainly helped me get off the ground as a 15 year old. I didn't expect anything glamorous, and I certainly didn't get anything glamorous, but I got my start, worked at it, and kept going despite not liking it. From what I can tell, most jobs may start that way, but as long as you learn and grow and don't get hurt in the process, it's worthwhile.

But in case those situations don't work out, and you need something with a more formal application process, there's a good amount of things to do beforehand. I break it down to three parts:

  1. Prep
  2. Apply
  3. Stick the landing

Preparation is key

Finding out what you want and where you're trying to apply should take a healthy amount of time, unless desperation overrides that. If you're really needing something ASAP, what's available will have a higher chance of not aligning with what you'd want or enjoy, so be prepared for that.

Your first job is a huge part of your resume, and can be the basis of your career. Try to list what skills you'd acquire by working a job, rather than the surface title of the job. Sure, working as a McDonald's cashier may seem like the lowest of the low, but you learn to work in a team, handle a high paced environment, and gain cash handling experience. You might intern as a document runner at an office, but you learn organizational skills, interface with multiple departments within a business, and get professional office-environment based experience. Keep this in mind as you apply.

As previously mentioned, make sure you have a good haircut, clean up nice, and put on some good clothes. No, your fresh washed jeans and a clean t-shirt won't do it. At the very least, a polo or button-up shirt with a collar, slacks, and a pair of good shoes. (not sneakers or sandals)


Apply

Before you do, however, keep in mind what skills you have to offer. While you're looking for a job, the person looking to hire is trying to acquire someone that will help their business. If you're going to be facing customers, but have 0 communication skills, you probably won't fit the bill. If they need someone who can work with excel and run calculations, but you don't know how to do that, they'll likely tell you no.

Some places require a cover letter. This is a good place to set an expectation, and detail out info about yourself to make yourself more appealing. This should only be an introduction, not your life story. Summarize why you think you would do well at this position, and list a couple examples if you have them. (aka "I would fit into a data analyst position as I took several advanced excel classes and got high grades") Don't make up examples if you don't have the info to prove it!


Stick the landing

Ever had a bite of food that had an aftertaste so awful, you don't remember how it tasted when you took the first bite? Same thing can happen when applying for jobs. Even if it feels like things aren't going well, make sure you finish strong and follow through till the end. Be courteous whether over the phone or in person, send follow up emails to anyone you speak with, and be sure to say thank you.

Nothing can ruin an interview, no matter how qualified, if you end on a bad note.


AND EVEN STILL YOU MAY BE REJECTED, BUT THAT'S OKAY

"It is possible to commit no mistakes and still lose. That is not a weakness. That is life."

Jean-Luc Picard

Sometimes, they'll find someone who fits the bill better, or they might not like what you have to offer. But that's OKAY. There's literally 1000's of jobs, and you're one guy. You can't be expected to be able to fit every single one of them. You'll find your place, get yourself established, and find your own way. Keep applying, and keep going strong!

  • 19 months ago
  • 2 points

Fall is coming, ask around your neighborhood if you can rake leaves, shovel snow, help around their house, etc. Can't be afraid to ask people if they need help. Ask family if they need help on a project. Ask your aunts and uncles, friends, etc. Know any family friends who's parents do home improvement? This is an awesome thing to learn about and you might get paid under the table. I've said this on every single "15 year-old looking for a job" post. Home improvement skills are a wonderful thing to learn and you will thank yourself later on in life for having learned them as a kid.

If nothing else, you can try to do things out of goodwill for an elderly neighbor or someone in need. May not get paid, but it helps their life out a bit and hopefully Karma pays you back some day for it.

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

I work at subway. less busy than other places, free subs and drinks, and healthier customers. If you are a good talker, maybe try caddying.

  • 19 months ago
  • 2 points

healthier customers

I don't think serving people entire loafs of bread covered with mayo makes your customers any more healthy than people that eat at In-N-Out or Whataburger lol.

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

lmao. I take a stale loaf (we throw them out each day) and put mayo on it. How'd you know my secret?

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

I am a bilingually illiterate psychic. Meaning I can kinda read people's minds in 2 languages.

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

If you're illiterate, how can you READ their minds?

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

Kinda is the key word there. Meaning can somewhat understand what they are saying but I will only be able to understand a few words per sentence. Illiterate people can still understand a few written words.

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

At that age, most job-jobs are out of reach but as others have said there is always neighborhood help stuff. Lawn mowing, etc.

As for employment, you can try grocery stores, movie theatres, restaurants. Depending on your state and the individual businesses themselves, they might hire you for light shifts doing things like bagging or ticket-tearing. Usually by 16 you can start working part time for real.

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

One with a not-punched screen. One where google chrome can hardly run with Discord and GeForce NOW in the background.

Wait...you want one that that can hardly run with chrome, discord, and GeForce NOW? Seems a bit odd. ;)

No, but for real, just put in as many apps as you can muster. And, when you do find your first job, jeep putting in more apps. Shoot for a couple a month. You may be happy where you are but always keep looking at the newest opportunities.

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

Lmao I worded it wrong. I was talking about my current laptop.

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

I got my job by adding every vaguely computer related class on my resume, perfecting it, running it through a fuckton of people and then applying to every job with the word computer in the title on monster and indeed for a good few weeks. It definitely worked

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

fast food chain, grocery store as shelf stocker, bagger etc.

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

Honestly the best thing to do what other people have said about lawn mowing and other types of jobs. There really aren't many places that hire at 15. Best thing to do is focus on school and wait till you are 16.

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

If you can get a job or not will depend on the state but most places i.e chain places won't hire anyone younger than 16.Odd jobs e.g mowing grass, shoveling snow, etc are what you are realistically looking at 15.

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm 15 too, and this has been a problem. Although, here are a few suggestions (this is what I've done before):

  • Mow lawns (depending on the size, I charge ~$20 per mow w/trim)

  • Run a paper route (I think that the paper company will provide your pay)

  • Babysitting (~$10/hour)

That really helped me make my money to build my PC.

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