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Talcover01
  • 29 months ago

Alright so ive been curious.. Why does everyone guy 3-400 watts higher than it really requires? I understand a hundred by why more than that? And I'm sure theres a reason.. Is it for overclocking or?

Comments

  • 29 months ago
  • 5 points

Okay, people choose to use a PSU that is several hundred watts about your requirements due to two main reasons. One, power supplies tend to operate most efficiently around 50-60% load usage. This increase in efficiency leads to a decrease in operating costs in regard to energy usage. The second reason people choose to use a power supply several hundred watts higher than they need due to future upgrading. Maybe they will go with a second GPU, or heavily overclock the CPU and the GPU. It just gives you more options in the long run.

  • 29 months ago
  • 2 points

To add on to this, greater efficiency has other benefits. A bit less heat, which leads to less noise, for example. Higher wattage also often means running fanless longer. Nice bonus.

For the second point, a 650w power supply may seem silly for a Ryzen 3/GTX 1050 build, but later down the line it could power an overclocked Ryzen 1700x and GTX 1080 ti without pushing it too far. This is especially true for more specialized builds- going from a stock 8 core Threadripper/midrange GPU to the 1950x and dual Vega cards overclocked might be a completely valid plan for someone, and that second build will take an astronomical amount of power under load compared to the first.

Plus sometimes you can find a higher wattage PSU for less than a lower wattage one of the same line due to sales.

  • 29 months ago
  • 2 points

Depends on the build, the actual parts, whether or not they will OC, if they care about power efficiency and so on not to mention deals (sometimes you can get a 100W more for $2).

Some people also plan to add a second GPU so they account for it in advance.

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  • 29 months ago
  • 2 points

Please keep feedback polite and constructive.

  • 29 months ago
  • 1 point

You mention nothing about efficiency or future upgrade path.....

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  • 29 months ago
  • 3 points

Future upgrade path is irrelevant, as we are witnessing PC components becoming more and more energy efficient.

That makes zero sense. Upgrading has nothing at all do with how efficient parts are. Adding better parts generally means power is used.

When people see 400W as their system's power rating, they think they need an 800W PSU, becase PSUs tend to be performing at their best at 50-60% load.

PSU's perform best at 1% load. Not 50 to 60%....

  • 29 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, I think the person was mistaking "better" with "more efficiently."

  • 29 months ago
  • 2 points

Not at all. It is very seldom that I see people using 800 watt PSUs as you suggested. It is a lot more common to see 500-600 watt ones. Which makes sense as that's about twice as much as most people will pull under standard use loads. How if upgrade path irrelevant as GPU's may be more energy efficient at similar performance levels but if they chose to upgrade to better components they may need the headroom. You are only highlighting one side of the coin.

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