Description

Should be able to do anything I need.. Went together relatively smoothly considering the quantity of water cooling components..

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Comments

  • 3 months ago
  • 3 points

Looks sweet! Just out of curiosity, what will the build be doing with its processing power?

I just built a 3960X system, but definitely not as shiny and liquid filled as yours.

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

My personal use case is software development (compiling) and GIS data processing. I develop software that does route optimization (logistics) and often need to locally run big problems in order to reproduce and diagnose software issues.

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

Very cool. Have a blast with the new rig!

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

Did you have any issues fitting the XL-ATX board in the O11 Dynamic XL? Also, is this the black version of the case? I cant seem to find them anywhere unless I pay a mark up.

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

There were no issues with the fit (although this site says it isn't compatible, it was fine.)

It is the black case - I am luck enough to live near 2 Microcenters and ran in once they showed up on the website. That's also how I scored the CPU although I had to wait in a line for them to open. 2 chips showed up and I got the last one that day.

  • 23 days ago
  • 1 point

Hi,

I spotted this case on NewEgg when searching for an XL-ATX case for the same Mobo. NewEgg list it as XL-ATX compatible yet the Lian Li site states its not XL-ATX compatible, which was really disappointing as this case ticked all the other boxes for my needs. You are the second system builder i have found now that shows it can fit an XL-ATX MoBo, so that's great.

Just wondering though, as XL-ATX is basically the same width as E-ATX but longer, are there any missing mounting holes for the Mobo's bottom edge? And is there a loss of any of the expansion slots?

It also looks as though a second PSU can be fitted?

Cheers,

OOL

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

Just a question. Did you plug both 8-pin ATX 12V connectors on the MB? Trying to figure out if it's actually needed, since this site doesn't like most of the PSUs I try to pair with it.

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

I did plug them both in and I also plugged in another one on the bottom right corner that is supposed to support the PCIe. I have read on forums for other boards that this isn't always strictly necessary. Usually the extra CPU power is only needed for extreme overclocking, but I can't say for sure about this board and CPU.

My PSU did have the connectors so I went ahead and used them. I also just checked the manual online and it doesn't seem very helpful on this question. Still, I'll paste it here:

"1/2)ATX_12V_1/ATX_12V_2/ATX (2x4 12V Power Connectors and 2x12 Main Power Connector) With the use of the power connector, the power supply can supply enough stable power to all the components on the motherboard. Before connecting the power connector, first make sure the power supply is turned off and all devices are properly installed. The power connector possesses a foolproof design. Connect the power supply cable to the power connector in the correct orientation.The 12V power connector mainly supplies power to the CPU. If the 12V power connector is not connected, the computer will not start.To meet expansion requirements, it is recommended that a power supply that can withstand high power consumption be used (500W or greater). If a power supply is used that does not provide the required power, the result can lead to an unstable or unbootable system" and "3) OC_PEG (PCIe Power Connector)The power connector provides auxiliary power to the onboard PCI Express x16 slots. When two or more graphics cards are installed, we recommend that you connect the power cables from the power supply to the connectors to ensure system stability."

So, sorry not much help there. Maybe someone else knows for sure.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

In theory a single 8 pin EPS can handle something along the lines of 235W of power. That is MUCH more than the vast majority of CPUs could ever draw. A 4-pin supports 155W. Unfortunately the most readily available source for this info (an article on overclock.net) has since been taken down, so we're just left with the forum posts. Either way, in theory, a 8+4 EPS could handle 390W power draw from the CPU. Which is well within the stock settings of all thread-ripper CPUS. And anything Interl brought to the table when they had had their power hungry monsters. HOWEVER, an overclocked 32-core CPU in thread-intensive workloads could draw around (and sometimes even a bit over) 400W depending on voltages (and temperatures since efficiency and stability decreases with temperature, which requires higher voltages, so more power) so ... yeah, the second 8 pin might well be necessary in this case. This kind of discussion has been going on since around 2011-ish when high end motherboards started showing up with dual 8-pin connectors for processors that would only draw 180W max when HEAVILLY overclocked. Then again, even 1200W power supplies back then didn't have dual 8 pin EPS.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

That is a lot of fittings in that picture with the boxes. Impressive build! Must have taken a lot of planning.

  • 3 months ago
  • 3 points

I did end up with a few leftover 45s. At the time I placed the order for fittings, I wasn't quite sure how everything would fit together. It was nice to have a good selection to solve unanticipated problems on the fly.

The most complicated thing to solve with the fittings was to use a 90 and a double 45 on each of the top and bottom radiators. This got me around the corner of each fan and angled into existing case holes to route from bottom radiator to the top on the other side.

  • 25 days ago
  • 1 point

I wondered about that!! That tube just disappears, and I was scratching my head.

I had to pull out my new, empty case just now to find the slots you refer to in another comment below, and NOW it makes sense! I wasn't planning on using those drive bays anyway.

I only have 2 rads (top/bottom XE Series) in the build I'll be doing in about 2 weeks, but I think I'll try to borrow your trick :) Not watercooling the GPU just now.

In the future when 3080Ti comes out and I upgrade, I'll try to add in the 3rd side mount rad as well as put the GPU in the loop.

I've actually had trouble trying to find pics of soft-tubing builds, most seem to go with hard lines which I don't want to do with my first custom loop......I want to ease my way into that. I'm glad I ran across your build!

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Awesome part and build. Contratulations! Nice job maxing out the 4 m.2 sockes on the MB. Thanks for posting. Enjoy! P.S. That green RGB pic is the bomb!!

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks.. I made sure everything could be controlled to some extent with a single RGB software. The RAM can also be sync'd although there are more patterns etc available with its own separate software.

I actually put the 4 m.2's on the included add in card for now because I wanted to test it out.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

It pains me how little info and pictures are of this build .

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Sorry - I tried to be as complete as I could on the parts list.

I wish I had more skill with photos. It was hard to capture decent ones especially in the middle of the night when I finished.

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

What did you think of the parts, what was your experience building it, how did it all come together, did you have trouble with any one piece of hardware or software, did you make a RAID? Is there a particular reason you went with any particular component? I thirst for such knowledge, and respect how much time and effort clearly went into this build. The parts list is very complete, and the description is ... two sentences.

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

I was amazed at the motherboard - just the weight of it with the full backplate and heatsinks. It's just massive and so sleek looking, blows away anything I worked with before. The CPU is nicely presented as I'm sure you've seen in the unboxings, followed instructions carefully and had no problems with pin contact etc. (I've watched a lot of youtube videos..) Regarding the build, I didn't have any serious issues - and I have little experience with custom water cooling so that is surprising. I did build a loop from a kit maybe 15 years back, but since then it's always been either a tower cooler or corsair CLC..

I was lucky to find a way to route the tubing from the bottom radiator to the top. Or maybe it's like der8auer read my mind in the design when he cut two slots in the motherboard tray exactly where they had to be for the tubing to fit. It took a 90 and "double 45" on each radiator to get the tubing around the fan and then angled through that back slot. The tube sits flush on the back and curves in a C along the back of the tray. I removed the 2 hot swap hard drive sleds from the back because I'm not using them, but I could fit them back in. When I held the top drive sled in the case to see if it would interfere with the top tube, it did touch and even slightly press against the tube where it comes out the back. The pressure is so slight I don't think it would impede the flow but only 98% sure on that.

The tubing could probably have been simpler if I went directly from CPU to GPU or vice versa, but I wanted a radiator or 2 between the components. I have read this doesn't matter and it all evens out but it made me feel better. I also didn't plan a way to mount the radiator, but got lucky again. I have a 3d printing hobby and hit up thingiverse where I found a bracket design to tie it to the radiator. Printed it and worked just fine.

I put the 4x sabrent NVME drives onto the 4x gen 4 add-in card that is included with the motherboard and I set it up in RAID 0. The PCIe x16 slot comes off the CPU instead of the chipset. If I put the 4 drives on the motherboard, this might also have been fine but 2 of them go through the chipset and I think one of them conflicts with the SATA ports if you need all of those. TRX40 has 8x lanes between CPU and chipset so there is no bottleneck to use the 4 slots on the motherboard but that's not how I tested it. In crystal disk mark I am getting over 15000MB/s reads and writes (sequential) which is insane. Single 4TB volume is more than I need but blazing fast.

I actually built the system first on open bench top to be sure the components all worked before the trouble of putting it into the case. I made a simple loop (CPU, pump, and just 1 radiator) for this step. (I left the GPU with the included air cooler.) I was nervous about water leaks so I bought some home depot pipe fittings and a pressure gauge and put in 0.6 bar of air pressure to test for leaks. Initially it was slow leaking air but I found it was in the leak tester fittings themselves which weren't tight enough. The leak stopped once I tightened those up and I left it holding pressure for almost an hour. (This idea came from a similar leak tester EK sells but it was out of stock everywhere.) After draining the loop and installing in the case, I repeated that setup with the air pressure. There is a picture of that contraption installed here

Component selection: Nothing particularly exciting here, but I'll try. I've liked the look of the O11 dynamic since I first saw it, but it looked unlikely to fit this motherboard, especially with all 3 radiators.. So I went for the XL version and that was fine. I wanted to go all in for AMD with this one, but I ended up getting NVidia 2080 TI because it's so much faster than 5700 XT in most benchmarks. When AMD comes up with a bigger NAVI GPU I'll hopefully switch and hand me down this one to my son. I picked this RAM specifically because it was the maximum "officially supported" speed and also on the motherboard's QVL. I've had trouble in the past with some memory reliability and wanted none of that if possible. 3200 CL14 - and Trident Z works with the motherboards RGB Fusion software to some extent. I wanted to not have a whole lot of different RGB software and avoided mixing in any Corsair (e.g. fans) for that reason.

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

Edit: "I also didn't plan a way to mount the radiator reservoir, but got lucky again. I have a 3d printing hobby and hit up thingiverse where I found a bracket design to tie it attach the reservoir to the radiator"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you, you sir or lady are a gentleperson and a scholar. Awesome work with the leak tester, it's an affordable way for most people to try out most of a loop before risking water death. Also impressive work with the bracketing and coordinating the loop (I too would personally prefer having a radiator between major heat sources, whatever people say about the flow equalizing it) and even the RGB. Like DAMN.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Great build. Did you win a lottery?

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

Haha, no.. I did buy some AMD stock around when they made the Zen 2 announcement though and that would cover most of it if I sold now :)

This is upgrading from a i7-5960x system I built when that launched, so it's been a while. I know the next one will also be a while so I decided to just go for it.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Pretty sweet.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

To anyone out there, how's the new sTRX4 Velocity block vs the Heatkiller IV? They seem very similar in design.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Holy ****, man! That's amazing!

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm practically drooling at the site of this, it's everything I'd want in a pc. Shame that I have the money but absolutely no clue how to build even the most basic pc. Read all your comments on this build but I'm left even more baffled and in awe of it haha. It looks spectacular!

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Super nice build!! Congratulations!

I have a couple of questions. I am also considering getting the Lian Li 011D XL case; the only concern I have it isn't a very quiet case? Is the noise discernible?

And how is your 8 TB SSD Raid 0 working out? Which PCI-E slot did you use for the add-in card. And is the OS able to boot off the card?

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

The case itself is silent but the 10 fans can be quite loud when ramped up :) Sorry, I know not quite what you asked - but the case itself comes with no fans and I imagine the sound depends almost entirely on how many fans at what speed they are running. I don't have a way to measure it here. I will say everything is very cool. I have a few 3d printers in here that drown out any PC noise and I'm often wearing a headset.

My RAID is actually only 4 TB because I used smaller drives, but should be the same thing for 8TB with 2TB drives. They are in the card populated in the 3rd slot down which is an x16 slot. Yes, the OS boots from that RAID.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

How powerful would this build be as a 4k video editor in Resolve or Premier Pro? Thx.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

I don't use those applications, so I can't say. But maybe there are some benchmark reviews out there. Sorry.

I did find this link on Google and seems legit: https://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Premiere-Pro-CPU-performance-Intel-Core-X-10000-vs-AMD-Threadripper-3rd-Gen-1629/

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Why can't I figure out where the second inlet outlet for the top and bottom radiators are??

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Both the in and out fittings are on the same side and face of each radiator, but the visible fitting is a straight fitting going up or down, and the other (hidden) fitting is a 90 degree angle. The 90 degree angle directs the tube toward the far side of the radiator closer to the motherboard tray. Then, each of these is connected to a "double 45" fitting that brings the tube almost parallel with and behind the back side of the radiator so that the tubing can go through a slot in the motherboard tray to the other side of the case. A picture here shows where the tube enters the back side of the case for the top radiator. The bottom is almost identical but exits just behind the power supply behind the cover where it is hidden in this picture.

Sorry - I realize even the careful description is confusing. There is probably a better way to say it.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Amazing build. Looking to do the same this week and ordered already most of the stuff. Some questions .... after desperately searching and researching for days now :)

  1. Did you buy the O11DXL-2 extension thing for the case and the motherboard or can I add the Aorus Extreme just as it is?
  2. Is this RAM QVL? If not, does everything work fine?
  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point
  1. It worked fine as-is. I didn't buy the motherboard extension.

  2. The RAM I used was F4-3200C14Q-64GTRS (I believe TRS must be for Trident Royal Silver.)

QVL does not mention above kit but it does have these 2 similar sounding ones: F4-3200C14Q-64GVK (This seems to be a Ripjaws kit.) F4-3200C14Q2-128GTZ (trident z, not royal, 8x16=128GB)

Both of above have same timings, but I think these look nicer (subjective) and of course they have RGB, so I hoped/figured/guessed it would be close enough. Anyway, it has worked out very well- no memory errors etc. in my testing.

I assume you could find the QVL also, but here's their list: https://download.gigabyte.com/FileList/Memory/mb_memory_trx40-aorus-xtreme.pdf

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

https://www.gskill.com/qvl/165/299/1552462216/F4-3200C14Q-64GTRS-Qvl

On the G.Skill site, it apparently also lists the Gigabyte TRX40 motherboards (including TRX40 AORUS XTREME) in their QVL page above. So that seems good.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

What is your intake / exhaust and push / pull configuration?

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

I put intake on bottom and side and exhaust on the top and back.

I don't know if that is best but it seemed most natural somehow. The case has dust filters everywhere except the rear fan.

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  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

No but closer than I'd have liked - Most of these prices aren't specified by me but by the site.

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